Jorge Acetozi is a software engineer who spends almost his whole day having fun with things such as AWS, CoreOS, Kubernetes, Docker, Terraform, Ansible, Cassandra, Redis, Elasticsearch, Graylog, New Relic, Sensu, Elastic Stack, Fluentd, RabbitMQ, Kafka, Java, Spring, and much more! He loves deploying applications in production while thousands of users are online, monitoring the infrastructure, and acting quickly when monitoring tools decide to challenge his heart’s health!

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November 27, 2017

July 2, 2016

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Books, courses and notes
Continuous Delivery For Java Apps [e-book]

Continuous Delivery for Java Apps: Build a CD Pipeline Step by Step Using Kubernetes, Docker, Vagrant, Jenkins, Spring, Maven and Artifactory

This book will guide you through the implementation of the real-world Continuous Delivery using top-notch technologies that are in high demand by the best companies around the world. Instead of finishing this book thinking "I know what Continuous Delivery is, but I have no idea how to implement it", you will end up with your machine set up with a Kubernetes cluster running Jenkins Pipelines in a distributed and scalable fashion (each Pipeline run on a new Jenkins slave dynamically allocated as a Kubernetes pod) to test (unit, integration, acceptance, performance and smoke tests), build (with Maven), release (to Artifactory), distribute (to Docker Hub) and deploy (on Kubernetes) a Spring Boot application to testing, staging and production environments implementing the Canary Release deployment pattern to mitigate risks.

 

This is the book I wish I had found when I was learning about Continuous Delivery; that's why I wrote it. It will bring to you years of experience implementing Continuous Delivery in many different projects.​

Pro Java Clustering and Scalability: Building Real-Time Apps with Spring, Cassandra, Redis, WebSocket and RabbitMQ

This book is a step-by-step guide on how to build a real-time chat application using Spring Boot, WebSocket, Cassandra, Redis and RabbitMQ. The application code is available on GitHub and you can start cloning the repository and running it on Docker right now: https://github.com/jorgeacetozi/ebook-chat-app-spring-websocket-cassandra-redis-rabbitmq

 

Although this is a programming book, it also brings many interesting infrastructure discussions and tips about Continuous Delivery, Docker, NoSQL (Cassandra and Redis) and so on. This book also discusses on how to horizontally scale the WebSocket Chat Application using a full STOMP broker like RabbitMQ.

 

My objective writing this book is to bring to readers a new experience mixing a lot of development code with infrastructure interesting and didactic discussions. I’m sure that you'll really enjoy it! :)

WHAT ARE PEOPLE SAYING?

Stanislav Zlatinov | Java Backend Engineer

Hello, Jorge. I am working on a chat application for exercise purposes, but not a simple Java Socket one. Of course that there are a lot of things that have to be taken into consideration, such as the load, the way data is stored, the protocol of communication, and so on. While searching for information, I found your book. I am very happy because you managed to write it in a very good way, with a lot of questions and answers, trying to introduce a way of thinking. Thank you!

Ranzy Blessings | Java Backend Engineer

Hi there! Well done on the awesome book you wrote (Pro Java Clustering and Scalability). It has taught me a lot and I love it :) 

Log Management with Graylog, Elasticsearch, MongoDB, Nginx, Fluentd and Docker

In this hands-on book, you will learn how to centralize and manage logs using the awesome open source Graylog2 and create a scalable, high-throughput and high-available log processing production infrastructure deploying Elasticsearch and MongoDB clusters as well as Nginx on top of Docker containers. Besides, we will use Fluentd to send logs to many outputs, such as GELF and Amazon S3.

 

To make everything even more realistic, we will create our whole environment using different virtual machines managed by Vagrant (deploying everything to "localhost" is not that exciting, you know?). Just grab a beer, open a terminal, type "vagrant up" and have fun!